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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
watches over and over. this is the one i wear most of the time. a jennifer miller watch. it's a little pricey. it's one of those pieces -- i didn't think i would like a big watch on me. i really like it. it's 300 bucks an can get it at jennifermillerjewelry.com. >> what about you and jennifer, people are talking. >> they should. it's a good deal. >> everything she does is beautiful. she does a lot for charity, too. what is your favorite thing. >> my favorite thing is this cargo eye lighter. you put this little -- you will hate me for shooting it, literally, you dab it on the inside of your eyes. i say it makes me feel like a princess. the words they use on the website is it lightens and brightens and makes your eyes look bigger. >> how come you get it and we don't? >> because i'm hoarding it. >> this is not the only one. >> and you can get murs from it. mursa. whatever you call it. if you put it on naked while you're in a gym. >> terrifying. >>> coming up, bobbie thomas, jill martin, the chef and all here. >> because they are among our favorite people and will be here with their favori
in the u.s. our dr. jennifer ashton is here. it's dig gusting. they found out that test, one out of seven wouldn't pass the test, that's conservative. >> this is precisely why i stay out of my own kitchen. but in actuality, erica, there are a significant number of food-borne illnesses in the country have year resulting in about 325,000 hospitalizations the cdc estimates and about 5,000 estimated deaths due to foodborne illness. >> it's serious. probably a number go unreported so the numbers could be potentially higher. >> absolutely. >> so, what is it? where are the germiest, grimiest, bacteria-laden spots we need to clean up? >> basically anywhere you put your hands from the second you walk in your kitchen. remember, you can potentially bring germs into your kitchen before you start cutting. anywhere from the faucet and sink to the refrigerator to the stove handles. everywhere. but these are really the biggest hot spots. they start really with what we use to clean our kitchens, which are sponges. >> this -- i can just say, this is a plea to everyone at home. if you're ever in my kitchen,
of foodborne disease we see every year. jennifer ashton is here with more. disgust. one out of seven kitchens wouldn't pass the test. that was conservative, they said. it is probably worse in reality. >> precisely why i stay out of my own kitchen. but in actuality, erica, there are number of foodborne illnesses every year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 estimated deaths due to foodborne illness. this is not an insignificant issue. >> it is ear just. actually a number of them also go unreported. numbers could be potentially higher. >> absolute. >> i what is it? where's the germiest, grimeiest, most bacteria laden spots in the kitchen we need to clean up? >> anywhere that you put your hands from the second you walk in your kitchen. remember, you can potentially bring germs into your kitchen before you start cutting. anywhere from the faucet and sink to the refrigerator and to the stove handles and everywhere. but these are really the biggest hotspots and start really with what we use to clean our kitchen which is are sponge. >> can i just say this is a plea to everyone, don't u
the program started. during that conversation, jennifer, dave and judy convince me that we should create a group like mothers against drunk driving. the idea would be a national advocacy group devoted to ending distracted driving. that was born in the studios of cnn. during the year since, jennifer, dave, judy and other members have travelled the country doing important and inspiring work, putting a human face on a terrible problem. at last year's summit, we learned that distracted driving is an epidemic. it is an epidemic because everyone has a cell phone, and everyone thinks they can use it while driving. you all know this. if i asked for a show of hands -- which i am not going to do [laughter] -- i know that everyone of you has a self done. and i also know that everyone has used it while driving. do not deny it. we are hooked on it. that is why it is an epidemic. there is no bigger distraction than people on a cell phone or people texting and driving. there is not. you cannot drive safely doing that. i want to say a special word of thanks to the chief of police of washington, d.c. she
with here in the city. >> reporter: jennifer coffee said habitat is looking for 30 first-time home buyers. she said they won't be able to build unless they have a family. >> needing 30 families means that we're putting some homes on hold a little bit. >> reporter: in order to be eligible for a habitat home families have to meet the qualifications. coffee says the biggest hang-up? families' fear of taking on a mortgage. >> if a person is paying more than $400 in rent, they're throwing their money away. >> reporter: but coffee said a few habitat homes have gone into foreclosure, leaving them vacant. >> there is a mortgage payment that these families have to pay. the average is $350. so if, if they don't pay the $350, then unfortunately they can't stay. >> reporter: habitat said they hope it sends a message to low-income families, if they want a home, now is the time. >> all right. let's get you to the daily briefing. the white house davely briefing. white house spokesman robert gibbs offering comments on hurricane earl. >> we will let you know when that happens. yes, ma'am? >> do you have a
of illinois. joining me now to talk about this is deputy personal finance editor jennifer merritt. she oversaw the research for the "wall street journal." the bottom line here is for that first job, businesses seem to be preferring not the ivy leagues, but others. these are no slouch schools. this is not like, oh, gosh, let's take second best. those are great schools. why, though, this over the ivy leagues? >> for these entry level jobs people are hoping to grow candidates into the company with. and so one of the reasons is they come very academically prepared. they've all had a major. so they've really got the great, deep skills in a subject. and then because they've got to really fend for themselves at these big schools and take advantage of various resources and network and the wide networks. they're also sort of able to come in, hit the ground running, and that well roundedness. >> ivy league graduates are seen as less -- >> they're less technically prepared in a lot of ways. most ivy league schools don't have majors in a traditional sense, don't have a lot of that bread and butter course
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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